Author Topic: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)  (Read 3183 times)

BargainValueHunter

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"Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« on: September 13, 2011, 03:56:27 PM »
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/1989/10/30/72667/index.htm

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Wouldn't you like to become partners with someone who would double your money every three to four years ad infinitum? To put it another way, wouldn't you like to invest with the next Warren Buffett? Riches come to investors who, early in their lives, find great money managers. Buffett is certifiably one of the greatest. His early clients are now worth tens of millions of dollars (see box). He achieved that by compounding money consistently and reliably at about 25% per annum. The young investors you will meet here show signs of comparable talent. But even if they can return only 20% a year -- most have done at least that well so far -- $10,000 invested with them today would be worth $5.9 million in the year 2025.
Albert Einstein called compound interest "the greatest mathematical discovery of all time".


Rabbitisrich

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Re: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2011, 05:41:51 PM »
Good stuff, but what are the Cramers doing on that list? It's incredible that Seth Klarman managed funds from age 25, and not from friends and family! Does anyone know of written material from Klarman's under-30 period?

BargainValueHunter

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Re: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2011, 07:48:06 PM »
Good stuff, but what are the Cramers doing on that list? It's incredible that Seth Klarman managed funds from age 25, and not from friends and family! Does anyone know of written material from Klarman's under-30 period?

I don't think it is the "Mad Money" Jim Cramer.
Albert Einstein called compound interest "the greatest mathematical discovery of all time".

netnet

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Re: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2011, 09:00:44 PM »
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I don't think it is the "Mad Money" Jim Cramer.

It is the mad man himself.

seshnath

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Re: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 03:59:35 AM »
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I don't think it is the "Mad Money" Jim Cramer.

It is the mad man himself.

Yes, it definitely is. 

http://www.deepcapture.com/jim-cramer-is-a-complicated-man/

BargainValueHunter

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Re: "Are These the New Warren Buffetts?" (Fortune Magazine 1989)
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2011, 07:37:54 AM »
It is the same man  but not the same persona.

I meant Cramer in 1989 wasn't screaming on TV as the lunatic host of MAD MONEY on CNBC.

He was NEVER Buffett but I think FORTUNE was just looking at the then current hot shots and crowbarred Warren's name into the title.
Albert Einstein called compound interest "the greatest mathematical discovery of all time".