Author Topic: Questioning PTSD  (Read 2475 times)

Cigarbutt

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Re: Questioning PTSD
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2018, 05:43:20 AM »
Recent article from the Canadian Underwriter:
https://www.canadianunderwriter.ca/insurance/traumatized-witnesses-van-attack-make-case-accident-benefits-1004131225/

Interesting example of a legal precedent that is having a significant impact on the definition of the threshold necessary to determine a link between an "accident", a mental condition such as PTSD and the compensation related to mental "injuries".

Tough topic with scientific and social overtones.
I would say that this evolving issue hasn't been accounted for by the underwriters up to this point.


Jurgis

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Cigarbutt

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Re: Questioning PTSD
« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2018, 04:19:06 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/13/magazine/veterans-ptsd-drone-warrior-wounds.html

Interesting read as I was analyzing the potential market share of the Da Vinci system (Intuitive Surgical) for robot-assisted procedures and realizing how there is an evolving recognition of "moral injuries". Mind under matter.

flesh

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Re: Questioning PTSD
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2018, 09:58:18 AM »
I wonder if the net psychic loss due to the actual/perceived purposelessness of recent wars in the combatants, plus their close ones, and society versus past wars affects the problem.

Or, if your friend is blown up in front of you as part of an eventual end to jewish concentration camps and you're successful in the end... and the world agrees... vs you have no idea why you're there and when you get back everyone wonders what the point was immediately thereafter and more so over time.

In one case your a hero, your friend is a hero, everyone's a hero in everyone's eyes for the rest of their lives when they get home. In another, humanities general difficulty with nihilism is magnified and you chance of recovery isn't largely ameliorated.

Jurgis

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Re: Questioning PTSD
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2018, 11:31:25 AM »
I wonder if the net psychic loss due to the actual/perceived purposelessness of recent wars in the combatants, plus their close ones, and society versus past wars affects the problem.

Or, if your friend is blown up in front of you as part of an eventual end to jewish concentration camps and you're successful in the end... and the world agrees... vs you have no idea why you're there and when you get back everyone wonders what the point was immediately thereafter and more so over time.

In one case your a hero, your friend is a hero, everyone's a hero in everyone's eyes for the rest of their lives when they get home. In another, humanities general difficulty with nihilism is magnified and you chance of recovery isn't largely ameliorated.

Although I agree that WW2 was a war with really clear moral purpose, there were a bunch of past wars that were purposeless too. WW1, for example, seems to have been pretty pointless... although some people might disagree.

With WW2 it's interesting how well the defeated nations picked themselves up. Germany, Japan, even Italy. I still think it's amazing that coming out of WW2 a lot of former enemies became mostly friends (minus Soviet camp) and were integrated into global community.
"Before you can be rich, you must be poor." - Nef Anyo