Author Topic: Affordable Care Act  (Read 1399 times)

globalfinancepartners

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Re: Affordable Care Act
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2018, 07:09:29 PM »
Quote
the current system seems to be a mash-up of all that is unholy in capitalism and socialism with little, to none, of the benefits of either.

Yes. Well said


Spekulatius

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Re: Affordable Care Act
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2018, 09:39:01 PM »
From recent surveys, the percentage of US respondents who:
-would support single-payer system managed by government: 60 to 70%
-would distrust the government always or most of the time: 60 to 70%
?

From a recent survey:
What is meant by a health insurance premium?
24% responded the best type of health insurance you can buy or a bonus you get at the end of the year if you stay covered.
??

Food for thought:

Definitions of affordable:
a)inexpensive to buy
b)inexpensive to maintain

Single payer does not necessarily mean that the government will run it. It does mean tha the government needs to provide the framework for it. The single payer insurance in Germany for example is not run by the government, but in Britain it is (I believe).
To be a realist, one has to believe in miracles.

Cigarbutt

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Re: Affordable Care Act
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2018, 05:32:54 AM »
Single payer does not necessarily mean that the government will run it. It does mean tha the government needs to provide the framework for it. The single payer insurance in Germany for example is not run by the government, but in Britain it is (I believe).
The NHS in Britain is state-run.
The German example is instructive. If reform is considered in the US, the German hybrid system perhaps has something to offer. Interesting though if one looks through the prism of historical path dependency, I understand that the present healthcare "compromise" in Germany essentially rests on a set of political decisions taken after the Franco-Prussian war! Interesting also because the man behind the scheme, Otto von Bismarck was conservative, authoritarian and anti-socialist. The idea was to quiet the agitation of the populace in order to make it as a country. In 1883, he passed a law requiring laborers to insure themselves through sickness funds complemented by an employer contribution. The system has evolved but its foundations have remained intact to this day. The scheme is not perfect and some want more "reforms" but I sense that most Germans are happy with it. Do I get this right?

The way the German healthcare system functions may be a more palatable inspiration for the US because it means that the core societal values (personal freedom and responsibility etc) are maintained. Bismarck was able to introduce the concept of solidarity without naming it. But he was awfully shrewd.

Spekulatius

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Re: Affordable Care Act
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2018, 04:07:07 AM »
Single payer does not necessarily mean that the government will run it. It does mean tha the government needs to provide the framework for it. The single payer insurance in Germany for example is not run by the government, but in Britain it is (I believe).
The NHS in Britain is state-run.
The German example is instructive. If reform is considered in the US, the German hybrid system perhaps has something to offer. Interesting though if one looks through the prism of historical path dependency, I understand that the present healthcare "compromise" in Germany essentially rests on a set of political decisions taken after the Franco-Prussian war! Interesting also because the man behind the scheme, Otto von Bismarck was conservative, authoritarian and anti-socialist. The idea was to quiet the agitation of the populace in order to make it as a country. In 1883, he passed a law requiring laborers to insure themselves through sickness funds complemented by an employer contribution. The system has evolved but its foundations have remained intact to this day. The scheme is not perfect and some want more "reforms" but I sense that most Germans are happy with it. Do I get this right?

The way the German healthcare system functions may be a more palatable inspiration for the US because it means that the core societal values (personal freedom and responsibility etc) are maintained. Bismarck was able to introduce the concept of solidarity without naming it. But he was awfully shrewd.

Yes, I believe most Germans are happy with the system, especially if you would put up the US system as an alternative. I believe that Bismarck was shrewd to introduce health insurance because he saw a the huge potential for unrest and let’s not forget they Germany is the intellectual birthplace of communism (Marx, Engels). Without it, history may have been different and I think it is conceivable that Germany would have become communist without it.

The health insurance was the first corner stone of what would later to become “soziale Marktwirtschaft “ , which is capitalistic system with Social boundaries. This also means for example that many German companies don’t just see themselves as profit optimizer, but consider it their mission to make all stakeholders happy (employees, community, banks, shareholders). Some companies became more like US companies in terms of profit Maxime (Siemens was once a “caretaking” company and has become much more profit oriented, but some remain this way - BASF
, BMW for example).  This goes both ways, because if a company gets into trouble, the employees/unions are expected to stick it out and help with cost cutting and restructuring. Deutsche Bank is one that is also now much more Anglo/American and it hasn’t really worked for them at all.
To be a realist, one has to believe in miracles.