Author Topic: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?  (Read 4526 times)

BG2008

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European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« on: February 25, 2018, 08:18:05 PM »
I have read in the news about European No-Go Zones where the police cannot enter certain areas or regions without backup.  Do such a zone really exist?  Have they gotten worse after the recent migrant crisis?  If one is concerned about safety for his family while traveling aboard, what is the best way to avoid this?  I know we have quite a bit of a European constituent on this board.  Please share your experiences.  If you have details on Italy, it would be greatly appreciated. 


Gamecock-YT

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2018, 01:50:05 AM »
You're just going to be visiting the tourist sites? There's nothing to worry about.

writser

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2018, 02:25:32 AM »
Maybe you have watched too much Fox TV? Nothing to worry about. Visiting some tourist attractions in Italy is about as safe as visiting Pike Place Market, Central Park or Yosemite National Park. Probably safer since Italians don't own as much guns.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 02:29:59 AM by writser »
When you are dead, you do not know you are dead. It's only painful and difficult for others. The same applies when you are stupid.

Paarslaars

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2018, 02:27:53 AM »
Indeed, chances are non-existent that you would accidentally walk anywhere near those places.
There is nothing to see...

thowed

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2018, 03:02:45 AM »
I laughed when I read this, then thought - this is why it's so important that we all travel as much as possible - it's the only way to educate ourselves, because what we read or hear can often be exaggerated for effect (the media doesn't make money by saying everything was 'normal' today).

I think a number of Europeans might ask the same question about the US, with all the shootings we read about in supposedly safe spaces like schools, cinemas etc.  And if people are like the President, why they must all be so rude!

I have had wonderful times travelling through a number of states in the US, and the vast majority of people I've met have been incredibly charming.  But I might not have known that if I'd only read the papers.

BG2008 - I hope this is clear that I'm not having a go at you - just saying how misinformation spreads to scare us.  And what the others said - it's a common sense thing - avoid dark alleys on your own at night!  Tourist sites can attract pickpockets so don't flash your money around.

However, as ever, also DYOR (for specific cities).  e.g. If you're going to somewhere like Naples, then you do want to be a bit more careful than Milan.

I hope you have a great trip.

writser

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2018, 03:41:54 AM »
Quote
I laughed when I read this, then thought - this is why it's so important that we all travel as much as possible - it's the only way to educate ourselves, because what we read or hear can often be exaggerated for effect (the media doesn't make money by saying everything was 'normal' today).

Agreed.

I think a number of Europeans might ask the same question about the US, with all the shootings we read about in supposedly safe spaces like schools, cinemas etc.  And if people are like the President, why they must all be so rude!

True, however I think it is a typical trait of some, especially older, Americans to view any country other than the USA as a shithole, to quote the president. I.e. they go to Norway or something, one of the safest and wealthiest countries in the world, and they worry about no-go zones, whether there will be running water, electricity and what to do if the streets are covered in horse manure because surely nobody owns a car there. Of course I'm exaggerating a bit but if you are born in a small, insignificant country it is much harder to develop such an attitude.

For similar reasons I think a lot of Americans are (too?) home-biased when it comes to investing. If you are born in Belgium or Costa Rica you are pretty much forced to invest in foreign companies (or at the very least companies operating outside your country borders) right from the start. If you are born in America you don't have to. That's not a bad thing in itself but the risk is that you start dismissing foreign opportunities without even looking at them. Chinese company? Surely it's a fraud. Fiat? Why would I buy that when I heard on the news that Italy is riddled with no-go zones? Something in Poland? Surely the communists will nationalize it?

But now I'm completely derailing this topic. I'll stop. Italy is beautiful. You'll love it. Don't worry.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 03:49:06 AM by writser »
When you are dead, you do not know you are dead. It's only painful and difficult for others. The same applies when you are stupid.

Spekulatius

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2018, 04:07:22 AM »
Just be aware of pickpockets in tourists sides, they are way better than in the US. They won’t hold a gun on your head, they will just rid you of your wallet without you knowing. Generally speaking, Europe is much safer than the US, especially tourists sites.
To be a realist, one has to believe in miracles.

Hielko

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2018, 04:22:14 AM »
I have read in the news about European No-Go Zones where the police cannot enter certain areas or regions without backup.  Do such a zone really exist?  Have they gotten worse after the recent migrant crisis?  If one is concerned about safety for his family while traveling aboard, what is the best way to avoid this?  I know we have quite a bit of a European constituent on this board.  Please share your experiences.  If you have details on Italy, it would be greatly appreciated.
If you are worried about keeping your family safe I suggest booking a one way ticket to Europe, given that the homicide rate/inhabitant is an order of magnitude lower. Or perhaps those US numbers are just skewed by cops killing blacks, and there is nothing you have to worry about ;)

[/fox mode]

thowed

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2018, 05:31:30 AM »
To bring things back to topic, if you have any more specific questions about Italy e.g. where you're thinking about going, do say and I'll do my best to help.

thowed

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2018, 05:40:46 AM »
For similar reasons I think a lot of Americans are (too?) home-biased when it comes to investing. If you are born in Belgium or Costa Rica you are pretty much forced to invest in foreign companies (or at the very least companies operating outside your country borders) right from the start. If you are born in America you don't have to. That's not a bad thing in itself but the risk is that you start dismissing foreign opportunities without even looking at them. Chinese company? Surely it's a fraud. Fiat? Why would I buy that when I heard on the news that Italy is riddled with no-go zones? Something in Poland? Surely the communists will nationalize it?

We're all guilty of this.  It wasn't that many years ago I told my dad that I had some investments in the US and he frowned and said, 'Isn't that a bit risky?'.

Sorry for going off-topic again...