Author Topic: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?  (Read 3700 times)

oddballstocks

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2018, 05:48:32 AM »
I can take you to a few No-Go Zones in East Cleveland as well, same with Cincinnati, and that's in urban areas.

Why don't you come out to W PA with me and we'll go driving down some rural dirt roads, the type of places where people come out of their house if they don't recognize the car and yell at you asking what you're doing.  I have on accident a few times turned onto barely passable dirt roads and I'm always met by a local who isn't happy I'm there.  And these are the types of locals who have an abundance of guns and spots to hide a body...

I've only been to Europe once, but it felt much nicer than the US.  We never worried about making a wrong left turn and being in a ghetto.  I did stumble on a gypsy camp, but it seemed like they kept to themselves.

In most of the Rust Belt it's common to have a guard at the entrance of a factory.  In most cases (now) this guard is making sure your car isn't stolen while you're working.

But like most places in the world, if you have street sense and can navigate away from those sorts of areas then America is incredible.
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BG2008

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2018, 06:05:30 AM »
"If you're going to somewhere like Naples, then you do want to be a bit more careful than Milan."  - Could you elaborate on this?  Could you elaborate on the pick pocketing?  Ways to lower the chance?  I've gotten my stuff stolen in Spain before.  It's annoying because you have to get new Drivers License, CC, etc.  Anything else I should be aware of? 

Generally, we're doing a Milan, Venice, Rome, and Florence trip

I want to clarify and give a perspective on my question.  If I had a good friend booking a flight to NYC and they said that they were about to book an Airbnb in East New York and will take the subway to Manhattan.  I would tell them "hold on a minute."  I would also tell them don't make eye contact with people asking for money.  Once you make eye contact, they know they've got you.  I have no idea what it is like in Europe.  As a value investor, I am just trying to do the best for my family with the research and risk mitigation etc.  In short, I don't want to book a nice AirBnb in the European equivalent of "East New York."

Yes, there are more No-Go Zones in the US.   

   

thowed

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2018, 06:31:58 AM »
In the simplest terms, it's a money/economy thing.  The north of Italy has much more than the south.  Naples is a relatively poor city, and has a certain historical notoriety.  It's certainly got its charms too, though, and I don't remember any problems when I was there en route to Pompeii.

Your trip sounds great, and should prove no problem.  If you're from NYC, then I really think you've nothing to worry about - I think anyone from a big city has all the street smarts/common sense they need for any place.

Y'know, don't have handbags open, keep your wallets in a safe place (or have one of those concealed belt ones for travelling), and be alert if you're in a packed bus crushed up next to others etc.  No different really from how I'd be alert on a subway.

I think the golden rule is 'be normal' i.e. try to blend in, and don't be too loud, so you don't attract attention to yourselves.

Sorry to hear you had your stuff stolen before.  Sometimes it's just bad luck, and there's nothing you can do.

Only other things I'd mention are maybe buy a paper guide book (just because I find the internet e.g. TripAdvisor to be unreliable) to read up on good places to stay and general neighbourhood info.

And also that if you're going in the Summer, Venice is INSANELY crowded (and I haven't been for a while) and Hot!  Florence will be pretty crazy too.

Traditionally, areas around train stations are also places to be a bit on your guard (a bit like I found with Greyhound neighbourhoods back in the day) as there are a lot of backpackers/tourists arriving and looking lost.  Nothing really to worry about though, just if someone tries to be friendly and help, I'm generally suspicious...

Hope that helps.

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John Hjorth

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2018, 07:13:48 AM »
BG2008,

Gio lives in Milan. I'm sure he would be up to some sincere travel advise to you, if you send him a PM. If you do that please ask him to reply in this topic for the benefit of us all. I think Uccmal was in Italy on vacation last summer. Perhaps he reads this and chim in.

We were on vacation in Rome in the summer 2012. Very, very nice and beautiful city.

I had heard about Italian pick pocketing before we went there, and to avoid bad luck I did buy a small one strap sling pack for that separate purpose. This one. Please note the zippers with two handles for two of the openings and rooms. Bought two tiny padlocks to lock the handles together for the two rooms/openings. And then nothing but the correponding keys in an attached leash in the pocket. Everything else [phones, cards, whatever] in the two padlocked rooms, and wearing the slingpack on my chest, not on my back.

I also always put one credit card in the safe at the hotel, for emergency purposes.

It can't hurt to ask at your host or hotel, if there are areas in the surroundings that are recommended to avoid.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 12:21:56 PM by John Hjorth »
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alwaysinvert

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2018, 07:26:53 AM »
What no-go zones usually means here (if we are talking about Europe as one thing, as North Americans are wont to do) is not that it is extremely dangerous for civilians to go there; it is that it is hazardous for police and ambulance to enter without extra protection because they risk being attacked.


rb

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2018, 12:13:54 PM »
The short answer is that No-Go zones in Europe are fictitious.

Just like anywhere the are rougher neighborhoods but even there you'll be just fine unless you make a total ass of yourself. But as others here have said you're unlikely to find yourself in one of those. Just as a reference, crime in the cities you'll go to is much lower than in any American city. So you really have nothing to worry about.

Pickpockets and hustlers are another thing altogether though and as an American you're likely to be a target. Law enforcement over the does a pretty good job keeping an eye out for these things. But unfortunately the large numbers and high skill level of these individuals means that pickpocketing is still a problem. So use common sense and be especially vigilent in and around major train stations.

nodnub

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2018, 02:19:44 PM »
"If you're going to somewhere like Naples, then you do want to be a bit more careful than Milan."  - Could you elaborate on this?  Could you elaborate on the pick pocketing?  Ways to lower the chance? I've gotten my stuff stolen in Spain before.  It's annoying because you have to get new Drivers License, CC, etc.  Anything else I should be aware of? 


BG, 

I agree that is a big hassle... to avoid that I wear a money belt under my shirt containing my passport, DL, bigger cash amounts, and backup credit card.  If I am travelling alone I wear this pretty much everywhere and never separate from it.

In my pocket I keep a small wallet with daily cash needs, and the primary credit card or ATM card that I will be using.  If I get mugged or pickpocketed then then I still have my money belt with passport, DL, and my second credit card. 

I absolutely never leave my passport and other critical stuff in a backpack. Bags can easily be stolen when you are distracted for 3 seconds in a bus station or subway etc.

I have never been mugged or pickpocketed, but there have been a few attempts of the latter!  :)



Jurgis

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2018, 02:58:44 PM »
Not Europe or US, but we had the "spray tourist with ketchup and then rob them blind while pretending to clean your clothes" attempt in Buenos Aires. I knew about it, so I got away from the "good cleaning samaritan" asap. I've recently heard a colleague lost his backpack with laptop, documents, etc. like this.

Italy is nice. Have fun.  8)
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rb

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2018, 03:07:11 PM »
"If you're going to somewhere like Naples, then you do want to be a bit more careful than Milan."  - Could you elaborate on this?  Could you elaborate on the pick pocketing?  Ways to lower the chance?  I've gotten my stuff stolen in Spain before.  It's annoying because you have to get new Drivers License, CC, etc.  Anything else I should be aware of? 

Generally, we're doing a Milan, Venice, Rome, and Florence trip
I can see if you've been picked before you can be a bit paranoid. I've traveled extensively and never been picked. But then I've also lived in a bunch of places in Europe and I'm pretty good at spotting "riskier" situations. OK, tips:

The places you're going nobody is going to pull a knife or gun on you and rob you. If anything it'll be a quick pull. So it's actually pretty easy to avoid. Keep your phone and valuables in your front pockets (much harder to reach). You could do the under the shirt carrier thing, but that's overkill and annoying. Don't do the American bulging wallet thing. You don't need your Costco and American Airlines miles cards when on vacation.

There's no reason to have your bank card on you unless you're going to an ATM. Just carry some cash for the day and a credit card. But I would bring several cards with me. Sometimes your bank blocks them or you may get nicked. Carry one and leave the others at the hotel. Never carry your passport on you. If you're not driving don't carry a license. Btw, in Italy at a lot of places museums, etc you need to leave a piece of ID as deposit for audioguides and other stuff. What I usually do is bring a bunch of no longer valid drivers licenses with me to use. That way I don't care what happens with them. Oh, and no tablets. You don't really need them and they're really easy to nick.

Let's see what else? Be vigilent of people approaching you. These are usually scammers. A common scam in Italy is for these guys to act as if they work for the rail company or the subway and offer to help you. Usually to buy a ticket or whatever. Don't engage with them. In Italy workers of public transit don't care if you need help. Also in places where you may be at risk there will be Carabinieri (military police) and possibly actual soldiers. You can signal to them or walk over to them. It's totally safe. You won't get shot in Italy because a cop felt insecure.

BG2008

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Re: European No-Go Zones Real Or Fictious?
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2018, 07:54:08 PM »
BG2008,

Gio lives in Milan. I'm sure he would be up to some sincere travel advise to you, if you send him a PM. If you do that please ask him to reply in this topic for the benefit of us all. I think Uccmal was in Italy on vacation last summer. Perhaps he reads this and chim in.

We were on vacation in Rome in the summer 2012. Very, very nice and beautiful city.

I had heard about Italian pick pocketing before we went there, and to avoid bad luck I did buy a small one strap sling pack for that separate purpose. This one. Please note the zippers with two handles for two of the openings and rooms. Bought two tiny padlocks to lock the handles together for the two rooms/openings. And then nothing but the correponding keys in an attached leash in the pocket. Everything else [phones, cards, whatever] in the two padlocked rooms, and wearing the slingpack on my chest, not on my back.

I also always put one credit card in the safe at the hotel, for emergency purposes.

It can't hurt to ask at your host or hotel, if there are areas in the surroundings that are recommended to avoid.

Thanks for the note.  I'll reach out to Gio