Author Topic: Ray Dalio TED Talk  (Read 6279 times)

Pauly

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Re: Ray Dalio TED Talk
« Reply #40 on: October 13, 2017, 02:39:15 PM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-13/bridgewater-is-said-to-refute-grant-s-assertions-in-client-call

Jim Grant apologizes and admits the report was sloppy and incorrect.

Did Jim wake up with a horse's head in his bed?
I kid. Interesting bit of drama to follow. And thanks for your input, TwoCities, it's always nice to hear first hand accounts.


Spekulatius

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Re: Ray Dalio TED Talk
« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2017, 05:28:48 PM »
As someone who spent roughly 3.5 years there, I can say the system works and it was incredibly refreshing versus my other corporate experiences.

It's a true meritocracy and you learn/grow very quickly because there is very little politics to the whole game. You do something well - you hear about it. You do something poorly - you hear about it. And you have the opportunity to provide the same feedback to the entirety of your team (including superiors).

There's no backhanded compliments, interpreting cryptic and ambiguous feedback, wondering what someone really meant, if you're really performing up to expectations or not, etc. etc. etc. You know - because you talk about it regularly. I'd say the feedback mechanims (both upwards and downwards) at Bridgewater is on equal par in importance as the actual job role.

Some people love it. Some people hate it. You find that all of the employees have been there like 7+ years or less than 2. Very few in between because they wash out or stay for life.

This begs the question - if you like Bridgewaters unique management style so much, why did you leave after just 3.5 years? In my book that is not a long time to spent with an employer your really like working for.
To be a realist, one has to believe in miracles.

sleepydragon

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Re: Ray Dalio TED Talk
« Reply #42 on: October 18, 2017, 07:42:01 PM »
As someone who spent roughly 3.5 years there, I can say the system works and it was incredibly refreshing versus my other corporate experiences.

It's a true meritocracy and you learn/grow very quickly because there is very little politics to the whole game. You do something well - you hear about it. You do something poorly - you hear about it. And you have the opportunity to provide the same feedback to the entirety of your team (including superiors).

There's no backhanded compliments, interpreting cryptic and ambiguous feedback, wondering what someone really meant, if you're really performing up to expectations or not, etc. etc. etc. You know - because you talk about it regularly. I'd say the feedback mechanims (both upwards and downwards) at Bridgewater is on equal par in importance as the actual job role.

Some people love it. Some people hate it. You find that all of the employees have been there like 7+ years or less than 2. Very few in between because they wash out or stay for life.

This begs the question - if you like Bridgewaters unique management style so much, why did you leave after just 3.5 years? In my book that is not a long time to spent with an employer your really like working for.

One possibility: there are people who think they are good fit to Bridgewater's culture but not the other way around.  ;)

TwoCitiesCapital

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Re: Ray Dalio TED Talk
« Reply #43 on: October 19, 2017, 06:48:56 AM »
As someone who spent roughly 3.5 years there, I can say the system works and it was incredibly refreshing versus my other corporate experiences.

It's a true meritocracy and you learn/grow very quickly because there is very little politics to the whole game. You do something well - you hear about it. You do something poorly - you hear about it. And you have the opportunity to provide the same feedback to the entirety of your team (including superiors).

There's no backhanded compliments, interpreting cryptic and ambiguous feedback, wondering what someone really meant, if you're really performing up to expectations or not, etc. etc. etc. You know - because you talk about it regularly. I'd say the feedback mechanims (both upwards and downwards) at Bridgewater is on equal par in importance as the actual job role.

Some people love it. Some people hate it. You find that all of the employees have been there like 7+ years or less than 2. Very few in between because they wash out or stay for life.

This begs the question - if you like Bridgewaters unique management style so much, why did you leave after just 3.5 years? In my book that is not a long time to spent with an employer your really like working for.

One possibility: there are people who think they are good fit to Bridgewater's culture but not the other way around.  ;)

The other possibility - I didn't move to NYC with an operations position as my goal and the 3 hours of commuting daily were wearing on me after 3.5 years.

I interviewed for 3 other positions internally. Received an offer for 1, but it was the one I wanted least of the 3. Decided that it made better sense to leave for a front-office position in NYC, with a better quality of life (no 3 hours a day of commuting), than it did to stay in a position I didn't care for at a company I loved.

That being said, I've been at this new company for nearly 3-years and can't confidently say it was the right decision.