Author Topic: The Fermi Paradox  (Read 8574 times)

adesigar

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The Fermi Paradox
« on: July 26, 2015, 11:13:40 PM »
Someone linked this on Facebook and I though it was a nice article to share.

http://waitbutwhy.com/2014/05/fermi-paradox.html


TorontoRaptorsFan

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2015, 06:28:06 AM »
I think more than likely if we encounter any form of intelligent life it will likely be robotic.

It's unfortunate more money wasn't pumped into NASA because getting telescopes off the ground takes decades to occur. The ATLAST telescope is not slated for another 10 years and is our best chance of seeing if life exists 150 light years away.

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Jurgis

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2015, 06:53:38 AM »
I've read this some time ago.

On one hand it is disconcerting.

On the other hand, if we found alien civilization(s), the likely effect would not be positive, so "no news is good news" perhaps.

If I had to bet, I'd likely bet for "they are so advanced we cannot detect them and they either ignore us or zoo/quarantine us".

I think that any Great Filter would be too leaky given the number of stars/planets/life/civilizations involved. Of course, I can't prove this especially if the Great Filter is "every techno civilization eventually self-destructs". It just seems that any filter would be too leaky.
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rkbabang

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2015, 07:26:23 AM »
One possible reason for the paradox is the simulation argument.

The more I think about it the more reasonable the argument seems.  I can't see any way to disprove it.

The short version is that as a civilization becomes more and more advanced and computing power becomes more and more powerful, they will likely run ancestor simulations.  If they do this, they will run lots of them.  Thus it is more probable that we are in one of those simulations rather than part of the "real" world.  Maybe quantum mechanics is just the simulations quantized approximation of the physics of the real universe.  There may be other life in the real universe, but no other life but on this planet in our simulation.

merkhet

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2015, 07:48:04 AM »
I can't remember who wrote/said that in the history of civilizations meeting for the first time, there has never been an instance in which a weaker and stronger civilization meet in which the stronger civilization doesn't immediately and aggressively dominate the weaker one. (It's possible this is a movie quote rattling around in my brain...)

rkbabang

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2015, 08:05:39 AM »
I can't remember who wrote/said that in the history of civilizations meeting for the first time, there has never been an instance in which a weaker and stronger civilization meet in which the stronger civilization doesn't immediately and aggressively dominate the weaker one. (It's possible this is a movie quote rattling around in my brain...)

Stephen Hawking has said similar things, that might be what you are thinking of.   http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/apr/26/stephen-hawking-issues-warning-on-aliens

Jurgis

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2015, 08:14:32 AM »
One possible reason for the paradox is the simulation argument.

The more I think about it the more reasonable the argument seems.  I can't see any way to disprove it.

The short version is that as a civilization becomes more and more advanced and computing power becomes more and more powerful, they will likely run ancestor simulations.  If they do this, they will run lots of them.  Thus it is more probable that we are in one of those simulations rather than part of the "real" world.  Maybe quantum mechanics is just the simulations quantized approximation of the physics of the real universe.  There may be other life in the real universe, but no other life but on this planet in our simulation.

Right, I know about simulation argument.

I don't bet on simulation argument since it is rather depressing possibility IMHO. They could pull the plug and we would not even have time to sell our BRK holdings. :P Or more seriously: what's the benefit of exploration if you're living in simulation?  ::) There are other deep philosophical questions in such situation, most of them quite depressing.

Certainly this is one of the possibilities though.
"Before you can be rich, you must be poor." - Nef Anyo

randomep

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2015, 08:42:49 AM »
Someone linked this on Facebook and I though it was a nice article to share.

http://waitbutwhy.com/2014/05/fermi-paradox.html

+1

thanks!

merkhet

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2015, 09:37:48 AM »
I can't remember who wrote/said that in the history of civilizations meeting for the first time, there has never been an instance in which a weaker and stronger civilization meet in which the stronger civilization doesn't immediately and aggressively dominate the weaker one. (It's possible this is a movie quote rattling around in my brain...)

Stephen Hawking has said similar things, that might be what you are thinking of.   http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/apr/26/stephen-hawking-issues-warning-on-aliens

Yes. That's the one. Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 27, 2015, 11:18:41 AM by merkhet »

TorontoRaptorsFan

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Re: The Fermi Paradox
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2015, 11:03:30 AM »
What I find most fascinating about all of this is what if we do see signs of intelligent life. Now what?

Do governments now shift significant resources to putting more telescopes into space? I'm sure there would be lots of debates questioning the merits of communicating with them. If there's one how many more civilizations are out there? Or are we only seeing one because they're the Super Predator or exceeded all odds and have managed like us to still survive...

My guess would be a massive collaboration amongst major nations in teaming up to pool resources together to monitor the situation. And science initiatives redirected towards more space based R&D.
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