Author Topic: Should Canada open up its borders?  (Read 2775 times)

LC

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2019, 08:12:13 AM »
Is it legal to DUI in a growing number of states? Is it legal to DUI for medical purposes?
The state laws re: MJ are in contradiction with FEDERAL laws.  If a case were to be pressed, FEDERAL law trumps state law.

Will be interesting to see what happens with this in the future.

I am surprised the Feds have not done anything on this.  Of course, they have not done anything with sanctuary cities or states either.  Two sets of laws in USA.

I'm arguing that your comparison is invalid because the nature of the two activities you are trying to compare are vastly different.

The proof that these activities are different is exemplified by the fact that one is used for medical purposes.

DUIs get people killed. Smoking "the reefer" in your mom's basement does not.

Do you think an accountant who works for Canadian WeedCo. should be banned for life from the US?
« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 08:13:56 AM by LC »
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DTEJD1997

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2019, 07:24:34 PM »
Is it legal to DUI in a growing number of states? Is it legal to DUI for medical purposes?
The state laws re: MJ are in contradiction with FEDERAL laws.  If a case were to be pressed, FEDERAL law trumps state law.

Will be interesting to see what happens with this in the future.

I am surprised the Feds have not done anything on this.  Of course, they have not done anything with sanctuary cities or states either.  Two sets of laws in USA.

I'm arguing that your comparison is invalid because the nature of the two activities you are trying to compare are vastly different.

The proof that these activities are different is exemplified by the fact that one is used for medical purposes.

DUIs get people killed. Smoking "the reefer" in your mom's basement does not.

Do you think an accountant who works for Canadian WeedCo. should be banned for life from the US?

According to the FEDERAL position in the USA, MJ use & possession, even for medical use is illegal & prohibited. 

Please see: https://www.safeaccessnow.org/federal_marijuana_law

As to driving while intoxicated, I am not 100% sure that there are Federal laws regarding that, but it is illegal in all 50 states & territories.  In the USA, driving regulations are usually left to the states & local muncipalities.

Border security & inflow & outflow of people is under sole jurisdiction & control of FEDERAL government in USA...so the FEDS see MJ use, growing, sales, etc. as strictly prohibited and you could make an argument that Mr. Weed clerk from Canada is MUCH worse than a drunk driver, as he is part of an ongoing criminal enterprise.

I don't think that a DUI should keep you out of Canada for life...but Canada is for Canadians, they set the rules for their country.  I would not like MJ people from Canada coming into USA willy nilly...but if they were upstanding citizens then maybe?

Just trying to enlighten you as to the position in USA.


rb

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2019, 09:06:52 PM »
Just for the record, i think both government positions are stupid.

This argument is stupid as well. This is how it should be handled:

BPO: Did you ever smoke pot?

Entrant: No sir!

Problem solved.

Just like we do every single day.

Cardboard

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2019, 04:56:11 AM »
I just went to the U.S. and they never asked me such question. The agent was very polite and questions similar to other times. Same kind of questioning as I returned to Canada from the Canadian side.

Although it was very slow at the border crossing or much longer than usual entering the U.S. and I suspect it had a lot to do with legalization of pot by our imbecile Trudeau. Questioning time for most cars was a lot longer than I ever recall or by a multiple. Also lots of cars held up for further inspection.

If the U.S. ban Trudeau due to his pot activities or even better incarcerate him for life that would suit me very well.

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Jurgis

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2019, 09:14:44 AM »
As I recall, you live in Colorado. On a recent trip to Arizona me and a friend were fantasizing about moving to the US. It didn't have anything to do with the ideology or politics of Canada vs. US. It was all about the weather. My buddy lives in Edmonton and he would prefer his nuts wouldn't be frozen all the time. In our fantasy we decided that Colorado would be an ideal place to be.

Then our type A personalities decided to find out how that could happen. Turns out that despite the fact that we have multiple graduate degrees, are upstanding citizens (not even parking tickets),  make well in excess of six figures, and we have a sizable bankroll saved up, there's basically no way that we could legally immigrate to the United States. That should tell anyone everything they need to know about the immigration policy of the US and their "open border".

Isn't that pretty much true for most countries?

Most (?) countries have millionaire visas/resident permits. I believe both US and Canada do. But that requires $XM investment into the country. Not sure if you and your friend would fall into this category. If you would, that's the ticket.

If you're not millionaire, then the only non-family-based way AFAIK is work based immigration and that would depend on finding an employer who would want to hire you and sponsor work visa. Presumably this is not very easy (anymore). But I'm not sure that's easy with Canada either. Maybe easier than with US, IDK.

BTW, some time ago I was looking at Australia, New Zealand. They pretty much do not admit anyone above 50 years of age on work visas (and possibly even on millionaire visas, not sure anymore). Which is even more strict than US.

So...  ::)
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EliG

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2019, 05:04:58 PM »
Isn't that pretty much true for most countries?

Most (?) countries have millionaire visas/resident permits. I believe both US and Canada do. But that requires $XM investment into the country. Not sure if you and your friend would fall into this category. If you would, that's the ticket.

If you're not millionaire, then the only non-family-based way AFAIK is work based immigration and that would depend on finding an employer who would want to hire you and sponsor work visa. Presumably this is not very easy (anymore). But I'm not sure that's easy with Canada either. Maybe easier than with US, IDK.

Jurgis,

Canada runs a program of professional immigration that doesn't require a valid job offer. The system is based on points. You get points for your age, education, work experience, English/French proficiency and so on. You score enough points without a job offer... you still get in. A valid job offer helps a lot because it gives you a bunch of extra points, but it's not mandatory.

There is one more caveat. You must prove that you have enough money to settle in Canada if you lack a job offer. The requirement is not too onerous. A single person needs $12K CAD. A family of four needs $23K CAD. This is hardly a deal breaker for a skilled professional, even from a third-world country.

A valid job offer waives the funding requirement.

Jurgis

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Re: Should Canada open up its borders?
« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2019, 10:24:30 PM »
Isn't that pretty much true for most countries?

Most (?) countries have millionaire visas/resident permits. I believe both US and Canada do. But that requires $XM investment into the country. Not sure if you and your friend would fall into this category. If you would, that's the ticket.

If you're not millionaire, then the only non-family-based way AFAIK is work based immigration and that would depend on finding an employer who would want to hire you and sponsor work visa. Presumably this is not very easy (anymore). But I'm not sure that's easy with Canada either. Maybe easier than with US, IDK.

Jurgis,

Canada runs a program of professional immigration that doesn't require a valid job offer. The system is based on points. You get points for your age, education, work experience, English/French proficiency and so on. You score enough points without a job offer... you still get in. A valid job offer helps a lot because it gives you a bunch of extra points, but it's not mandatory.

There is one more caveat. You must prove that you have enough money to settle in Canada if you lack a job offer. The requirement is not too onerous. A single person needs $12K CAD. A family of four needs $23K CAD. This is hardly a deal breaker for a skilled professional, even from a third-world country.

A valid job offer waives the funding requirement.

I see. I did not know that. Yes, this seems much more open than US or most other countries.

Thanks
"Before you can be rich, you must be poor." - Nef Anyo
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"American History X", "Milk", "The Insider", "Dirty Money", "LBJ"