Author Topic: Should we know other people's salaries?  (Read 2236 times)

rkbabang

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2018, 01:05:06 PM »
3) is wealth inequality a problem?
No quite the opposite. Value creating behaviour in society needs to be sufficiently rewarded to motivate those able to  to actually do so. The rest of society benefits from this behaviour because a rising tide lifts all boats, albeit only on an absolute level (the only thing that should matter) and not on a relative basis, causing the jealousy we see today with people complaining about wealth inequality. I suggest we treat them the same as any crying jealous child: tell them to work harder and if they steal from other kids or break their toys give them a time out.
Oh I agree on the treatment. When a child takes all the toys for himself, take the toys away and give him a time out before he can play again with the other kids.

You, like most leftists, are confusing "takes" and "earns".   "Takes" is when someone takes what someone else creates/earns through force or fraud (i.e. theft, taxation, etc).  "Earns" is when someone creates wealth in the free market without using force against another human being through labor or creativity and it is rightfully theirs.


LC

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #21 on: November 05, 2018, 01:07:40 PM »
The topic is literally about not telling underpaid workers that they are underpaid.
"Lethargy bordering on sloth remains the cornerstone of our investment style."
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Gregmal

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #22 on: November 05, 2018, 03:13:37 PM »
An employer finds a value investment(a good worker at a great price). What's wrong with this? Do we need to do everything for everyone now? If, as an employee, you feel underpaid, go test the market. If you're content, great. Who gives a shit what the guy next to you is making? If he's negotiated a higher deal, has better friends, is screwing the boss, that's really none of your business; not to mention if it leads to a higher salary maybe something you should consider doing too.

undervalued

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #23 on: November 05, 2018, 03:34:36 PM »
Based on the poll, I would say 59% of the people who answered are employees. :)
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it. - Will Rogers

LC

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #24 on: November 05, 2018, 06:47:11 PM »
Take a look at sports leagues for the exact opposite situation.
"Lethargy bordering on sloth remains the cornerstone of our investment style."
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Gregmal

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #25 on: November 05, 2018, 08:02:53 PM »
Take a look at sports leagues for the exact opposite situation.

Well, sure... but the market for 2nd baseman and goalies is much less populated than the market for project managers or financial analysts. And even further, you have more data than ever available to evaluate 2nd baseman and goalies. Especially compared to the everyday worker, who by the way, would likely throw a fit if an employer introduced a WAR(wins above replacement) and shot quality neutral save percentage type of model for evaluating their value vs peers...

LC

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #26 on: November 05, 2018, 08:10:40 PM »
Take a look at sports leagues for the exact opposite situation.

Well, sure... but the market for 2nd baseman and goalies is much less populated than the market for project managers or financial analysts. And even further, you have more data than ever available to evaluate 2nd baseman and goalies. Especially compared to the everyday worker, who by the way, would likely throw a fit if an employer introduced a WAR(wins above replacement) and shot quality neutral save percentage type of model for evaluating their value vs peers...
The market is not less populated. There are plenty of Division A 2nd basemen out there. The problem is lack of demand.

But this has nothing to do with wage transparency. There would be 30 starting 2nd basemen irregardless of whether contracts were public knowledge or not.

Also - there are plenty of employee assessment jobs and consultants out there. Hell, when I was consulting, our time and productivity was tracked over 15-minute intervals. This is not the issue.

The issue is that employers have more to lose and employees have more to gain, in terms of wage transparency. It is not widespread because employees do not have enough collective power to demand it.
"Lethargy bordering on sloth remains the cornerstone of our investment style."
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brk.b | cash

wachtwoord

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #27 on: November 06, 2018, 08:19:53 AM »
The topic is literally about not telling underpaid workers that they are underpaid.

If the worker is willing to pay for the wage he is not underpaid by definition.
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maybe4less

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2018, 08:29:57 AM »
The topic is literally about not telling underpaid workers that they are underpaid.

If the worker is willing to pay for the wage he is not underpaid by definition.

Right, and if someone is willing to sell the stock, it's not underpriced by definition.

rkbabang

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Re: Should we know other people's salaries?
« Reply #29 on: November 06, 2018, 08:33:01 AM »
An employer finds a value investment(a good worker at a great price). What's wrong with this? Do we need to do everything for everyone now? If, as an employee, you feel underpaid, go test the market. If you're content, great. Who gives a shit what the guy next to you is making? If he's negotiated a higher deal, has better friends, is screwing the boss, that's really none of your business; not to mention if it leads to a higher salary maybe something you should consider doing too.

Exactly.  That has always worked for me.  If you try to find a higher paying job and you can't then you are not underpaid.  If you can find a higher paying job, then take it.   You don't need to know what your co-workers are making to know what you are worth.  There is a market for your labor and it is up to you to find the price the market will bear.  People are not widgets, no two human beings are the same. Maybe the guy in the next cubical over with the same job title as you is making more (or less) than you for a reason.  Thinking that every person should be paid the same is like thinking that Huawei should be worth a trillion dollars because they make cell phones too.  Like companies, people are different. What one is worth on the market has only partial relevance to what another is worth.