Author Topic: The SAT Disadvantage score  (Read 1526 times)

rukawa

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The SAT Disadvantage score
« on: May 18, 2019, 11:59:54 AM »
SAT is now including a component which rates people higher based on social disadvantage:
https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2019/05/explaining-the-college-boards-new-adversity-scores/589708/

Wow.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 12:15:32 PM by rukawa »


UNF2007

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2019, 01:55:08 PM »
Saw that, not sure what the right answer is, but kids who have families that can pay for test prep/go to better schools etc. are clearly at an advantage. When I was a kid my parents didn't even know what the SAT was, I studied for it by checking out an old prep book from the library, while I worked a part time job bagging groceries. I did well enough to get into college, but I had no chance vs the people who were in the know about the stakes of it and had the money to prepare, given the same intelligence. So I'm not sure how comparable our scores were. I bet there are enough people out there who are pretty smart, but just don't have the resources to prepare, which is skewing the results enough that they have decided to do this.

Gregmal

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2019, 02:10:02 PM »
SAT and standardized tests are more about aptitude than test prep or circumstance. Math/logic and grammar/spelling... you either know it or you don't. If you have to memorize how to find the measurement of an angle or what quintessential means... you probably are going to struggle in life anyway. Common sense gets you to 650+ on each section, which along with solid grades and a bit of extracurriculars, gets you into most schools.

Deepdive

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2019, 09:53:09 PM »
It seems like the alteration is implemented to help traditionally under represented races such as Hispanics and African Americans stand out during the application process.  I have a "hunch" that this may actually uncover that Asian Americans in the rough neighborhoods are actually outperforming.  So a new objective score that is supposed to uncover outperformers in predominantly Hispanic and African American school districts may once again find itself uncovering that Asian American students outperform in these rough neighborhoods.  It could get a bit awkward.   

Let's not forget that there are actually poor Asian students. 

HalfMeasure

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2019, 10:08:34 PM »
SAT and standardized tests are more about aptitude than test prep or circumstance. Math/logic and grammar/spelling... you either know it or you don't. If you have to memorize how to find the measurement of an angle or what quintessential means... you probably are going to struggle in life anyway. Common sense gets you to 650+ on each section, which along with solid grades and a bit of extracurriculars, gets you into most schools.

I think this is a bit of a misconception. Sure, raw intelligence will get you very far on standardized tests, but studying also helps immensely. There are obviously limits on both extremes - i.e. if you're smart enough there's likely a floor on your score, and if you're not very sharp then there's probably a ceiling, but prep will help you within a neighborhood of your reality to a material degree.

SharperDingaan

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2019, 06:54:59 AM »
SAT scores have been 'gamed' for years, we just don't talk about it.
Makiing it a little 'fairer' for all is not a bad thing, and forces everyone to raise their game.

Agreed it's hard to do well if you don't prepare for the exam.
But it's a very different thing when you're always hungry, poverty is pulling the family apart, and you're dodging bullets/gangs in the shooting range outside your door. Versus well-fed Johnny/Suzie living in that quieter, often wealthier neighbourhod, who is often also doing an exam prep course. It would be surprizing if rich Johnny/Suzie did NOT do well, and a minor miracle if poor Johnny/Suzie actually managed to match their good score. Either handicap BOTH horses, or remove the handicaps entirely.

SAT's serve as a screen to find the 'best', for future development; no different to a NHL farm team.
Obviously the better your feedstock, the more of a competitor you can be.   

However SAT's are ALSO a screen for trade school .....
Still a very attractive option for poor Johnny/Suzie, often a social step-down for rich Johnny/Suzie.
But neither can do anything until they know how to read, write, add, reason, use basic lifeskills, etc.
SAT test material?

Jusr a different POV

SD




 

Deepdive

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2019, 10:14:47 AM »
SAT scores have been 'gamed' for years, we just don't talk about it.
Makiing it a little 'fairer' for all is not a bad thing, and forces everyone to raise their game.

Agreed it's hard to do well if you don't prepare for the exam.
But it's a very different thing when you're always hungry, poverty is pulling the family apart, and you're dodging bullets/gangs in the shooting range outside your door. Versus well-fed Johnny/Suzie living in that quieter, often wealthier neighbourhod, who is often also doing an exam prep course. It would be surprizing if rich Johnny/Suzie did NOT do well, and a minor miracle if poor Johnny/Suzie actually managed to match their good score. Either handicap BOTH horses, or remove the handicaps entirely.

SAT's serve as a screen to find the 'best', for future development; no different to a NHL farm team.
Obviously the better your feedstock, the more of a competitor you can be.   

However SAT's are ALSO a screen for trade school .....
Still a very attractive option for poor Johnny/Suzie, often a social step-down for rich Johnny/Suzie.
But neither can do anything until they know how to read, write, add, reason, use basic lifeskills, etc.
SAT test material?

Jusr a different POV

SD




 

People can choose to ignore SAT scores.  But top firms actually still ask for SAT score 1-5 years AFTER candidates graduate from college.  It used to be called an aptitude test.  Prep can add 50-200 points.  But it can't turn a 1,100 into a 1,500 even if they hire an one-on-one tutor. 

SAT adjustments is similar to companies using Adjusted EBITDA

Community Adjusted SAT Scores

mbreject

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2019, 09:43:39 AM »
I think this is a horrible idea. People are going to get into schools with curriculums they can't handle and might drop out.

stahleyp

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2019, 09:52:28 AM »
I think this is a horrible idea. People are going to get into schools with curriculums they can't handle and might drop out.

If that's true, why didn't some of the celebrity kids from the college scandal drop out?
Paul

LC

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Re: The SAT Disadvantage score
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2019, 10:13:14 AM »
Undergraduate programs are cookie cutter. No real difference between tier 1 and tier 2 schools. Plus when you're rich it's real easy to pay for "tutors" and such.

Personally I don't like this idea much...the best students should get into the best schools.

But in general I think the SAT is a poor scorecard, so I don't think it really matters if you take an inaccurate score and continue to add to the inaccuracy. Probably a net positive as you are getting more diversity (presumably) this way.
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