Author Topic: Enterprise Tech  (Read 434 times)

Castanza

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Enterprise Tech
« on: May 15, 2020, 08:09:20 AM »
Looking for book recommendations focused on the business side of tech. Preferably enterprise/corporate, but entrepreneurial would be alright too.

Thanks


SharperDingaan

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Re: Enterprise Tech
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2020, 09:08:24 AM »
You might want to do some background research first, then re-frame your question.
It's a big topic, and there are Masters level degree's in this subject! Just one of the many sub-sets ....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_software

What's the primary interest? IT development, enterprise application, or investor.
What's the expectation? tools, case studies, or investment ideas.
High or low tech?

As in most things, the glamorous (20% IT high-tech) attracts 80% of the interest.
Whereas it's the grunt applications (80% physical low-tech) that are both a a lot more profitable, and robust. The machines in the factories, warehouses, hospitals, buildings/aircraft/ships/mines, infrastructure, etc.

SD
 
« Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 01:41:52 PM by SharperDingaan »

Castanza

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Re: Enterprise Tech
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2020, 07:09:20 PM »
You might want to do some background research first, then re-frame your question.
It's a big topic, and there are Masters level degree's in this subject! Just one of the many sub-sets ....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_software

What's the primary interest? IT development, enterprise application, or investor.
What's the expectation? tools, case studies, or investment ideas.
High or low tech?

As in most things, the glamorous (20% IT high-tech) attracts 80% of the interest.
Whereas it's the grunt applications (80% physical low-tech) that are both a a lot more profitable, and robust. The machines in the factories, warehouses, hospitals, buildings/aircraft/ships/mines, infrastructure, etc.

SD
 

Hmmm youíre right. I guess my question is.....what is unique about the corporate/finance structure of tech specific companies (if anything). What are the norms and standards, in operation, execution, rollout. Yeah I get that itís broad, and Iím not after any specific segment. Anything that discusses ďthatĒ on an academic type level would be interesting.

SharperDingaan

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Re: Enterprise Tech
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2020, 04:18:10 PM »
Most should have a gross margin of 33%+, and pre-tax NI of around 10%+ of sales.
Simply because they don't have to pay much to distribute the product, and don't suffer much inventory loss.

Buy a physical good on-line. The physical goods seller has to ship it to the buyer (Fedex/UPS/etc). The IT seller delivers the software on-line - at minimal cost.

Think of Apple. There's minimal inventory risk, as there's little inventory (only physical product), physical product is typically not made unless pre-sold, and there is planned product obsolescence (exit from old lines while they still can). Lean inventory primarily as a supply chain buffer, and not as a sales tool. Minimal everyday writedowns to changing tastes.

SD
 
« Last Edit: May 19, 2020, 04:47:13 AM by SharperDingaan »