Author Topic: GDPR  (Read 4354 times)

Jurgis

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Re: GDPR
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2018, 01:49:41 PM »
I'm in EU right now and it's rather funny how different websites try to be GDPR compliant. I am not a lawyer, but I'd guess more than 80% of ones who try are not really compliant (hint: AFAIK, having a banner "Accept our cookies or else" is not GDPR compliant...). OTOH, there are websites that are likely compliant. And you don't see the behavior they present to EU users when you access their sites in US.

And then there are sites that clearly don't give a *&%^ about anybody accessing them from EU. Likely no enforcement will be coming... unless the website is big and gets sued or whatever.
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Spekulatius

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Re: GDPR
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2018, 04:50:08 PM »
I'm in EU right now and it's rather funny how different websites try to be GDPR compliant. I am not a lawyer, but I'd guess more than 80% of ones who try are not really compliant (hint: AFAIK, having a banner "Accept our cookies or else" is not GDPR compliant...). OTOH, there are websites that are likely compliant. And you don't see the behavior they present to EU users when you access their sites in US.

And then there are sites that clearly don't give a *&%^ about anybody accessing them from EU. Likely no enforcement will be coming... unless the website is big and gets sued or whatever.

I am guessing that software toolkit’s will be sold enabling to build a website that is compliant. could be a great business at least in the short run and probably sticky in the long run.
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watsa_is_a_randian_hero

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Re: GDPR
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2018, 07:40:49 PM »
This is my perspective working for a midsize financial consulting firm with 70 offices globally, that takes in a lot of data from institutional investing clients, and sometimes takes in PII on engagements, and also has an investment banking arm:

The new rules are so burdensome, that most people either aren't savvy enough to comply without tripping up on some small aspect and/or view it as too costly to fully comply in every way, so firms turn a blind eye to some aspects of compliance. 

oddballstocks

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Re: GDPR
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2018, 09:31:52 PM »
I'm in EU right now and it's rather funny how different websites try to be GDPR compliant. I am not a lawyer, but I'd guess more than 80% of ones who try are not really compliant (hint: AFAIK, having a banner "Accept our cookies or else" is not GDPR compliant...). OTOH, there are websites that are likely compliant. And you don't see the behavior they present to EU users when you access their sites in US.

And then there are sites that clearly don't give a *&%^ about anybody accessing them from EU. Likely no enforcement will be coming... unless the website is big and gets sued or whatever.

I am guessing that software toolkit’s will be sold enabling to build a website that is compliant. could be a great business at least in the short run and probably sticky in the long run.

Or more likely..blocks to entire continent's IP ranges.  We have a company that manages our firewall, they wanted to block everyone but the US. I protested and they asked how many clients I have in Europe/China/Russia...none.  They said most attacks and issues are stopped if you limit the site to the US if you do business in the US.  In the end I blocked Russia and China...and amazingly, or not surprisingly garbage traffic dropped like a rock.


Unless you're a multi-national with a compliance department I think this is the route most US companies will take.  Just block off Europe and call it a day.

If someone from Europe wanted to be a client we'd probably refuse them.  The hassle isn't worth it. It stinks this is the way things are going, but it's too costly to comply if you aren't a large company.
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Jurgis

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Re: GDPR
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2019, 02:48:38 AM »
Continued "screw you" to EU users from ... pretty much every single US based tech and media company:

Quote
By clicking continue below and using our sites or applications, you agree that we and our third party advertisers can:
•transfer your personal data to the United States or other countries, and
•process your personal data to serve you with personalized ads, subject to your choices as described above and in our privacy policy.

Or you can choose not to click continue and not get the content. F-ank you very much!

This particular one was from Fortune.com, but really variations of these are what you get on pretty much every single website when in EU. It's pretty much "no choice" choice. Either you waive your EU privacy rights, or you get no content. In some cases, there might be third choice to jump through 20 minute hoops that may eventually end up in some mix of who-knows-what. Still pretty much "screw you".
"Human civilization? It might be a good idea." - Not Gandhi
"Before you can be rich, you must be poor." - Nef Anyo
"Money is an illusion" - Not Karl Marx
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