Author Topic: Grocery Prices  (Read 6313 times)

Cigarbutt

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Re: Grocery Prices
« Reply #90 on: Today at 04:54:25 AM »
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Hulu recently had an interesting documentary series called “The Food that Built America” was pretty interesting from both a historical business perspective and a dietary/health standard one. As with most significant inventions, they are born out of necessity.
Thanks for the reference; i will check it out.
It seems Heinz was a pioneer (like Henry Ford) in plant productivity and Milton S. Hershey spontaneously knew that corporate responsibility was not a bland statement in the proxy documents. Both firms have evolved and now sell leveraged and edulcorated sugar.
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Productivity gains along the food chain (from agriculture through efficient supply chains and to the end plate) have been amazing over the years but, like many other things, seem to have reached some kind of plateau. Food inflation is a recurring (and sometimes very relevant) theme as people tend to note when prices go up while overlooking the fact that price inflation overall has shown a very favorable trend. About 100 years ago, the share of food (in-house and out) expenses vs total expenses was 40% and it has settled now at around 9.5% (2019). (Note: the degree of disposable income is an important ingredient here)
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/03/02/389578089/your-grandparents-spent-more-of-their-money-on-food-than-you-do
Notice the plateau since the dot-com era.
An interesting side effect of these productivity gains is that the typical American, in comparison to when a rocket was first sent on the moon, eats 400 more calories per day while adopting a more sedentary lifestyle. You can follow paleo, keto or Gwyneth Paltrow but, for the large majority of people, Lavoisier's conservation of energy applies.
So, adjusting for inflation and wages, over the last 100 years, the price of bacon has decreased 83% (according to a conservative source). Bacon to the masses and God Bless America.
« Last Edit: Today at 04:59:27 AM by Cigarbutt »


SharperDingaan

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Re: Grocery Prices
« Reply #91 on: Today at 07:26:52 AM »
On food production..

A very large % of existing production is extremely wasteful, and just goes to landfill, particularly in the US - the limitations are water availability, and production volumes at the expense of quality, and wastage. The 'solution' is increasingly being seen as integrated, drip-fed vertical greenhouses and fish/shrimp farms, in run-down urban centres - processing waste water.

The poorest neighbourhoods eating the freshest, and highest quality, fish/veggies - because they are the cheapest food available, grown in the neighbourhood, and the largest local employer. The 'farm' now in the city itself - not hundreds of km away. And yes - fish/veggies are not the only tings that are grown in these. Gotta maintain a cash flow  :) ....

SD

« Last Edit: Today at 07:29:10 AM by SharperDingaan »

stahleyp

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Re: Grocery Prices
« Reply #92 on: Today at 12:31:32 PM »
While I haven't kept up with the latest research, I don't know how healthy a vegan diet really is. You're missing some important vitamins like B12. You can take supplements for that though. Personally, I'd rather get my vitamins from natural sources. I do think eating some (but pretty low) levels of meat is probably the best bet.

On supplements...  Not many people eat a diet without fortified foods (milk, orange juice, corn flakes, grape nuts, bread, etc..).  All fortified because your diets with too few vegetables are wholly inadequate.

Nutritional yeast is fortified with B12 and that's how I get it.


I get the feeling that a lot of people are vegan because they don't want to hurt animals. That's fine and all but I'm not convinced that eating super processed food (fake meat) is better than eating grass fed organic beef. From my understanding, all of these studies showing that red meat is so bad for you is based on conventionally grown beef. Grass fed beef tends to be higher in CLAs and more vitamins, less fat, etc.

Nobody on a whole foods diet eats the fake meat or the processed sugar.  Iff they did, they wouldn't be on the diet. 

There are plenty of unhealthy vegans -- an Oreo cookie is vegan.  Coca-Cola is vegan.  If you do a study on them, pretty sure you'll find heart disease there.

Most of the time I try to avoid anything processed.  Wine of course is processed though.

BG2008's diet just isn't sustainable.  We can all be whole foods plant-based, but we cannot all be meat based.  Not enough land/water without additional deforestation.

Well, I think it makes sense to try to get vitamins from natural sources - sunshine instead of a vitamin D pill, for instance. I understand a lot of foods are fortified. But that's because of poor diets.

Whole foods eating and veganism are two totally different things. I think bg's diet it's probably sustainable but not if the whole world does it.

With Esselstein's study, if the patients had small amounts of meat/eggs did they not receive the benefits that he was shooting for?
Paul

ERICOPOLY

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Re: Grocery Prices
« Reply #93 on: Today at 04:18:59 PM »
Whole foods eating and veganism are two totally different things.

They're not mutually exclusive.  You have whole foods vegans (me), and then there are processed and junk food vegans too. 

ERICOPOLY

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Re: Grocery Prices
« Reply #94 on: Today at 04:22:54 PM »
With Esselstein's study, if the patients had small amounts of meat/eggs did they not receive the benefits that he was shooting for?

He had nobody like that in his study. 

His prescribed diet is the only one that has shown a reversal of cardiovascular disease.  Others have slowed down the progression, but none other has reversed it.