Author Topic: The optimistic take on Covid-19  (Read 9272 times)

DooDiligence

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Re: The optimistic take on Covid-19
« Reply #80 on: March 31, 2020, 10:48:33 AM »
[[[ The OPTIMISTIC take on Covid-19 ]]]

                            vs

[[[ The virtually unintelligible negative conversation re: Covid-19 ]]]
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Spekulatius

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Re: The optimistic take on Covid-19
« Reply #81 on: March 31, 2020, 11:57:11 AM »
The Virus might go into the Brain too. It would explain a lot.
Life is too short for cheap beer and wine.

clutch

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Re: The optimistic take on Covid-19
« Reply #82 on: March 31, 2020, 12:11:19 PM »
Welcome to the "Corner of Covid-19 and Politics"

Gregmal

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drzola

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Re: The optimistic take on Covid-19
« Reply #84 on: April 02, 2020, 07:54:42 PM »
This to shall pass.
What if everything doesn’t happen for a reason? What if, while clouds have silver linings, human miseries often don’t? What if money does, in fact, buy happiness? Platitudes create the illusion of a fair and orderly world, thereby preventing us from considering the possibility that it is, in fact, a grossly absurd and unjust world. They can keep us from appreciating the depth and completeness of certain tragedies, because they are designed to help us deal with our circumstances without losing our minds. And even when they are telling us that life is unfair or that nice guys finish last, the platitudes command us to conclude that it is what it is and you’ve gotta go with the flow. Platitudes, hammered into us from the time we first come to understand the language, discourage us from the kind of open inquiry that might lead to frightening conclusions, or that might cause us deep distress and disquiet. If it turns out that “what doesn’t kill you” can still turn you into, say, a blind quadriplegic, the world can seem too awful to bear.