Author Topic: Andrew Yang  (Read 5481 times)

LC

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Re: Andrew Yang
« Reply #80 on: November 26, 2019, 09:25:10 PM »
Few things:
-Democrats only addressing symptoms and not root causes, republicans instead profiting off root causes.
-Electoral college is outdated - we are no longer an agrarian economy.
-UBI I sadly support. Sadly in that it should not be needed, but as you mention it is becoming more needed daily. I see this as a failure of government.
"Lethargy bordering on sloth remains the cornerstone of our investment style."
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Castanza

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Re: Andrew Yang
« Reply #81 on: November 27, 2019, 07:13:34 AM »
I am not sure they UBI is the way to go but perhaps there is a way to find out. The US has a great advantage that with its size and diversity within 50 states a lot of economic experiments take place or could be designed to find out what works and what doesnít. I could imaging like distributing $1000 randomly (via lottery?) in one group and comparing it to a control group that gets nothing  could give some insights. Of course  itís not that same thing than giving UBI to everyone, but I bet one could get some insight. Or one could give UBI to a local cluster like a village.

I think a lot of changes should be tested in a small scale, before getting widely implemented. I think experimental economists and sociologists could deign many smart experiments that give us a lot of idea what works and what the effects might be.

I mean California tried single pay healthcare and it failed before it even got out of the gate. Silicon Valley is a primary "target fund" through vat taxes for many of the proposed policies (ubi etc.) So if California can't do it on their own how can we expect to do it at scale? It can be debated that they could have pushed forward with the plan and consolidated the funding channels. But it was quite clear it was going to be very very expensive.

Nell-e

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Re: Andrew Yang
« Reply #82 on: November 27, 2019, 10:10:47 PM »
I hate to beat a dead horse but nobody has responded to concerns about growing populist sentiment.  We have an immature narcissist who controls the nukes because of populism.  Trump probably would have lost in 2016 to a Democratic socialist (who wants to ban billionaires) had Clinton not rigged the Dem primary.  Populism is going to get worse at these levels of wealth inequality.  Am I the only one concerned about this?

I support UBI because I can't think of a better method to help the working class in the swing states.  Their communities are poor and there's no free market incentive for any corporation to set up shop. There's no money to be made hence no jobs, the population gets older, young people move out, residents get poorer, and the towns keep deteriorating.  Even if you're ok with letting those towns completely disintegrate, we still have the electoral college framework and the remaining citizens still have the power to vote and they'll become even more receptive to candidates with more radical messages.

If there's a way to break this cycle, I would love to hear it.
Few things:
-Democrats only addressing symptoms and not root causes, republicans instead profiting off root causes.
-Electoral college is outdated - we are no longer an agrarian economy.
-UBI I sadly support. Sadly in that it should not be needed, but as you mention it is becoming more needed daily. I see this as a failure of government.

@LC Thanks for acknowledging the growing threat of populism.  Not sure why everyone else is avoiding the subject like the plague.

Cigarbutt

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Re: Andrew Yang
« Reply #83 on: November 28, 2019, 07:58:07 AM »
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@LC Thanks for acknowledging the growing threat of populism.  Not sure why everyone else is avoiding the subject like the plague.
After all, this is not a Politics Board and I suspect that the motivation for most to come here is to make money, a motive which, by itself, is not a bad thing. But I would be careful with generalizations. Civic engagement can take many forms.

Anyways, your political inputs are thought-provoking and your reference to the plague made me think of a book The Plague, which I read a while back. If you haven't read it already, you may find it interesting. Camus tended to underline the absurdity of situations but I guess he could be labeled as an uncomfortable optimist. In The Plague novel, a form of populist and hysteric upheaval takes place with, initially, a collective denial and a focus on individualistic issues. However, the selfish obsession eventually gives way to an acknowledgment for the need to develop collective responsibility and, in the end, the populace goes back to its normal routine, almost as if nothing happened. In the concluding section, the narrator comes forward and suggests that there is more to praise than to condemn in humans.

Happy Thanksgiving and I wish {at least} universal and basic happiness to all during those turbulent times.