Author Topic: Ocasio Cortez Plan 'economic security for those unwilling to work'  (Read 10782 times)

cubsfan

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Re: Ocasio Cortez Plan 'economic security for those unwilling to work'
« Reply #110 on: April 05, 2019, 04:10:22 PM »
That's a good clip by Dalio - there is a lot to be concerned about - the wealth disparity. It's very obvious many have been left behind.

But I'm not sure I get your point about the populist. When government fails to represent the people, the populist can step in.
It was amazing to watch this happen in America in 2016.  The Republicans fought against Trump as hard as the Democrats did.

During the Republican Primary - the party came out with an awesome lineup of candidates - many could likely have done a great job
as the final candidate.  In the end,  Americans decided they did NOT trust ANY Republican politician.  Like the Democratic Party,
the Republican Party failed Americans too.   Americans were fed up with Washington politicians - More of the same? NOPE, you are out!

Trump with no money or ground game defeated all these candidates, Republican and Democratic, with a POPULIST message:
I am here to act in your best interest, NOT Washington's.

Government failed Americans - and they voted with their feet for a populist.

So I am really not tracking with your message here. What am I missing?

Is your point about the wealth disparity (which I agree with) or is your issue with the populist?


Spekulatius

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Re: Ocasio Cortez Plan 'economic security for those unwilling to work'
« Reply #111 on: April 05, 2019, 04:46:31 PM »
Quote
Is your point about the wealth disparity (which I agree with) or is your issue with the populist?

It’s a about both. The wealth disparity creates populism and the populist fans conflict to gain more power. Classic dictators handbook. Chavez, Hitler, Mao Tse Tung, Mugabe.....
Life is too short for cheap beer and wine.

Read the Footnotes

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Re: Ocasio Cortez Plan 'economic security for those unwilling to work'
« Reply #112 on: April 05, 2019, 05:14:40 PM »
That's a good clip by Dalio - there is a lot to be concerned about - the wealth disparity. It's very obvious many have been left behind.

But I'm not sure I get your point about the populist. When government fails to represent the people, the populist can step in.
It was amazing to watch this happen in America in 2016.  The Republicans fought against Trump as hard as the Democrats did.

During the Republican Primary - the party came out with an awesome lineup of candidates - many could likely have done a great job
as the final candidate.  In the end,  Americans decided they did NOT trust ANY Republican politician.  Like the Democratic Party,
the Republican Party failed Americans too.   Americans were fed up with Washington politicians - More of the same? NOPE, you are out!

Trump with no money or ground game defeated all these candidates, Republican and Democratic, with a POPULIST message:
I am here to act in your best interest, NOT Washington's.

Government failed Americans - and they voted with their feet for a populist.

So I am really not tracking with your message here. What am I missing?

Is your point about the wealth disparity (which I agree with) or is your issue with the populist?

I thought Dalio's comments sounded a lot like our previous discussion here. He does build on it and go in some different directions which adds to the conversation. There is more to consider if you choose to follow the links.

I also think that his comments regarding watching whether this will devolve are useful. The truth is that things could swing back and the world could be a better place, but continuing on the same path may lead to disaster. Any system that is taken too far will fall apart.

Dalio on what to watch:

Quote
The most important thing to watch as populism develops is how conflict is handled—whether the opposing forces can coexist to make progress or whether they increasingly “go to war” to block and hurt each other and cause gridlock. In the worst cases, this conflict causes economic problems (e.g., via paralyzing strikes and demonstrations) and can even lead to moves from democratic leadership to autocratic leadership as happened in a number of countries in the 1930s.